Art/ Collection/ Art Object

当麻曼荼羅
Taima Mandala

Period:
Edo period (1615–1868)
Date:
1750
Culture:
Japan
Medium:
Hanging scroll; ink, color, and gold on silk
Dimensions:
Image: 41 13/16 × 37 13/16 in. (106.2 × 96 cm) Overall with mounting: 74 1/4 × 45 1/8 in. (188.6 × 114.6 cm) Overall with knobs: 74 1/4 × 47 9/16 in. (188.6 × 120.8 cm)
Classification:
Paintings
Credit Line:
Charles Stewart Smith Collection, Gift of Mrs. Charles Stewart Smith, Charles Stewart Smith Jr., and Howard Caswell Smith, in memory of Charles Stewart Smith, 1914
Accession Number:
14.76.54
Not on view
The Taima Mandala represents the Pure Land of the Buddha Amida (Sanskrit: Amitābha) bordered on three sides by parables from the Sutra on the Meditation on the Buddha of Infinite Life (Kanmuryōjukyō). This text, portions of which appear in the boundaries between scenes, recounts the promise at the core of Pure Land School teaching: that those who concentrate on the Buddha Amida during life, and recite his name, will be escorted to his Pure Land, known as the Western Paradise, at the final moment of death. The painting depicts an enormous palace with a golden pond presided over by Amida and his retinue.

Musicians, dancers, and thirty-seven different types of celestial beings fill the skies and pavilions, surrounding the pond in the foreground. Those being born into the Pure Land emerge from lotus buds growing up through the water. The parables tell the story of Queen Vaidehi, who achieved birth there by performing sixteen meditations presented to her by Amida. The scenes along the bottom represent the nine levels of birth in the Pure Land, from lowest to highest. Based on Chinese Tang-dynasty compositions, the Taima Mandala was introduced to Japan in the Nara period (710–84), along with teachings about Amida’s Pure Land.
Inscription: Long inscription
Charles Stewart Smith , New York (until d. 1909; by descent to his heirs). ; Mrs. Charles Stewart Smith , Charles Stewart Smith Jr., and Howard Caswell Smith, New York (until 1914; donated to MMA).
New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "No Ordinary Mortals: The Human Figure in Japanese Art," 2007–2008.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Ukiyo-e Artists' Responses to Romantic Legends of Two Brothers: Narihira and Yukihira," March 27, 2008–June 8, 2008.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Arts of Japan," February 1, 2014–September 7, 2014.

San Antonio Museum of Art. "Heaven and Hell: Salvation and Retribution in Pure Land Buddhism," June 16, 2017–September 10, 2017.

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