Walking stick with a female nude and a Breton sabot on the handle, Paul Gauguin (French, Paris 1848–1903 Atuona, Hiva Oa, Marquesas Islands), Boxwood, mother-of-pearl [Pinctada margaritifera (black-lip pearl oyster)], glass, and iron, French

Walking stick with a female nude and a Breton sabot on the handle

Artist:
Paul Gauguin (French, Paris 1848–1903 Atuona, Hiva Oa, Marquesas Islands)
Date:
ca. 1888–90
Culture:
French
Medium:
Boxwood, mother-of-pearl [Pinctada margaritifera (black-lip pearl oyster)], glass, and iron
Dimensions:
Overall (confirmed): 36 1/2 × 2 1/16 × 1 11/16 in. (92.7 × 5.2 × 4.3 cm)
Classification:
Sculpture
Credit Line:
Bequest of Adelaide Milton de Groot (1876-1967), 1967
Accession Number:
67.187.45a, b
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 825
Gauguin made five trips to Brittany between 1886 and 1894. He liked the region's "savage, primitive" quality. His perception is embodied in the carving of this walking stick, with its snake-entwined shaft and handle in the form of a female nude supporting a Breton wooden shoe. The sole of the shoe slides open to reveal a hidden compartment.
Inscription: Label in red pencil inside receptacle: 118

In red paint below receptacle opening: L.52.24.44
Ernest Ponthier de Chamaillard (probably a gift from the artist) ; Adelaide Milton de Groot (by 1959–67; bequeathed to MMA)