Exhibitions/ Jerusalem 1000–1400: Every People Under Heaven

Jerusalem 1000–1400: Every People Under Heaven

At The Met Fifth Avenue
September 26, 2016–January 8, 2017
Exhibitions are free with Museum admission.

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Exhibition Overview

Beginning around the year 1000, Jerusalem attained unprecedented significance as a location, destination, and symbol to people of diverse faiths from Iceland to India. Multiple competitive and complementary religious traditions, fueled by an almost universal preoccupation with the city, gave rise to one of the most creative periods in its history.

This landmark exhibition demonstrates the key role that the Holy City played in shaping the art of the period from 1000 to 1400. In these centuries, Jerusalem was home to more cultures, religions, and languages than ever before. Through times of peace as well as war, Jerusalem remained a constant source of inspiration that resulted in art of great beauty and fascinating complexity.

This exhibition is the first to unravel the various cultural traditions and aesthetic strands that enriched and enlivened the medieval city. It features some 200 works of art from 60 lenders worldwide. More than four dozen key loans come from Jerusalem's diverse religious communities, some of which have never before shared their treasures outside their walls.

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The exhibition is made possible by The David Berg Foundation; The al-Sabah Collection, Kuwait; the Sherman Fairchild Foundation; the William S. Lieberman Fund; The Polonsky Foundation; Diane Carol Brandt; The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; the Ruddock Foundation for the Arts; and Mary and Michael Jaharis.

Additional support is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

The catalogue is made possible by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; the Michel David-Weill Fund; Tauck Ritzau Innovative Philanthropy; the Ruddock Foundation for the Arts; Christopher C. Grisanti and Suzanne P. Fawbush; and Helen E. Lindsay.

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Exhibition Objects




Al-Qazwini (1202–1283). "The Archangel Israfil," from 'Aja'ib al-Makhluqat (The Wonders of Creation and Oddities of Existence), late 14th–early 15th century. Egypt or Syria. Opaque watercolor and ink on paper. British Museum, London. © The Trustees of the British Museum