Art/ Collection/ Art Object

阿弥陀聖衆来迎図
Welcoming Descent of Amida and Bodhisattvas

Artist:
Unidentified Artist
Period:
Nanbokuchō period (1336–92)
Date:
late 14th century
Culture:
Japan
Medium:
Hanging scroll; ink, color, and gold on silk
Dimensions:
65 3/4 x 33 1/2 in. (167 x 85.1 cm)
Classification:
Paintings
Credit Line:
Gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, 1942
Accession Number:
42.25.37
Not on view
Like many of the works of art created to represent the Pure Land belief in salvation through faith, raigō ("welcoming descent") paintings like this one were indispensable religious furnishings at the time of death. Such raigo paintings depict the scene in which Amida (Sanskrit: Amitabha) and his attendants descend from heaven to take a believer back to the Western Paradise on a lotus throne. The scrolls were often hung by the bedside of the dying to ensure the prospect of rebirth in paradise. Since traditionally the dying lay with their heads to the north and their faces turned west, raigō paintings usually depict the Buddha and his entourage coming from the upper left down toward the lower right so as to meet the gaze of the dying. Sometimes silken cords were attached to Buddha's hand, offering the dying physical assistance during the journey to paradise.
#8845. Welcoming Descent of Amida and Bodhisattvas
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For Audio Guide tours and information, visit metmuseum.org/audioguide.
Abby Aldrich Rockefeller , New York (until 1942; donated to MMA)
New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Manifestations of the Merciful Bodhisattva: Kannon," 1989.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Seasonal Pleasures in Japanese Art, Part II," May 1, 1996–September 8, 1996.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Blossoms of Many Colors: A Selection from the Permanent Collection of Japanese Art," March 21, 2000–August 9, 2000.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Arts of Japan," August 19, 2000–February 5, 2001.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Great Waves: Chinese Themes in the Arts of Korea and Japan II," March 22, 2003–September 21, 2003.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Birds, Flowers, and Buddhist Paradise Imagery in Japanese Art," February 14, 2004–June 13, 2004.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "The Mighty Kano School: Orthodoxy and Iconoclasm," December 18, 2004–June 5, 2005.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "A Sensitivity to the Seasons: Spring and Summer," December 17, 2005–June 4, 2006.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "A Sensitivity to the Seasons: Autumn and Winter," June 22, 2006–September 10, 2006.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "No Ordinary Mortals: The Human Figure in Japanese Art," 2007–2008.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Ukiyo-e Artists' Responses to Romantic Legends of Two Brothers: Narihira and Yukihira," March 27, 2008–June 8, 2008.

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