Storage jar

Period:
middle Yayoi period (ca. 100 B.C.–A.D. 100)
Culture:
Japan
Medium:
Earthenware with applique
Dimensions:
H. 16 in. (40.6 cm); Diam. of rim 8 3/4 in. (22.2 cm); Diam. 11 in. (27.9 cm); Diam. of base 1 1/2 in. (3.8 cm)
Classification:
Ceramics
Credit Line:
Gift of Florence and Herbert Irving, 1992
Accession Number:
1992.252.2
Not on view
Contributions from Chinese and Korean immigrants enhanced the cultural complex—including wet-rice agriculture, bronze technology, spinning and weaving techniques, and a new ceramic aesthetic—that defines the Yayoi period in Japan. The elegant form of this jar was built of clay coils and then smoothed to an even base. Used for grains or liquid, this capacious jar is enhanced by bands of clay. The small tapered bottom indicates that this jar was supported either with a separate base or by inserting it into a depression in the ground.
Florence and Herbert Irving , New York (until 1992; donated to MMA)
New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Arts of Japan," 1998.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Art in Early Japan," 1999–2000.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Blossoms of Many Colors: A Selection from the Permanent Collection of Japanese Art," March 21, 2000–August 9, 2000.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Graceful Gestures: A Decade of Collecting Japanese Art," September 29, 2001–March 10, 2002.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "A Sense of Place: Landscape in Japanese Art," May 8, 2002–September 8, 2002.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Birds, Flowers, and Buddhist Paradise Imagery in Japanese Art," February 14, 2004–June 13, 2004.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Tribute to a Dedicated Collector: Mary Griggs Burke," June 30, 2004–November 29, 2004.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Masterpieces from the Permanent Collection," July 2, 2005–November 29, 2005.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Flowing Streams: Scenes from Japanese Arts and Life," December 21, 2006–June 3, 2007.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "No Ordinary Mortals: The Human Figure in Japanese Art," 2007–2008.

New York. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Ukiyo-e Artists' Responses to Romantic Legends of Two Brothers: Narihira and Yukihira," March 27, 2008–June 8, 2008.