Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History



  • Vase, ca. 1730
    Austrian; Vienna, du Paquier period
    Hard–paste porcelain; H. 6 3/8 in. (16.2 cm), W. 8 5/16 in. (21.1 cm)
    Gift of R. Thornton Wilson, in memory of Florence Ellsworth Wilson, 1954 (54.147.94)

    The ceramic manufactory established in Vienna by Claudius du Paquier (died 1751) was the second in Europe to produce hard-paste porcelain. In founding the factory, du Paquier was assisted by Samuel Stözel, the kiln master from the Meissen factory, and the earliest porcelain made in Vienna dates to about 1719. While the porcelain body produced by du Paquier is often very similar to that made at Meissen, the Vienna factory developed its own distinctive style of painted decoration.

    The decoration of this vase is unusual for du Paquier porcelain because of its subject matter. The main scene depicts a man seated at a tea table with a display of porcelain on a buffet. The inscription around the scene reads in translation: "China, you will not have called your arts unknown any longer; in Europe, you will triumph through the skill of Vienna." The inscription clearly calls attention to Vienna's success in learning how to make porcelain—an enormous accomplishment in eighteenth-century Europe—and it is likely that the man depicted in the scene is du Paquier himself. Thus, this vase is a particularly significant piece of du Paquier porcelain, a documentary object that refers explicitly to the factory itself, with an awareness of its place in the history of porcelain production.

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  • Vase, ca. 1730
    Austrian; Vienna, du Paquier period
    Hard-paste porcelain; H. 6 3/8 in. (16.2 cm), W. 8 5/16 in. (21.1 cm)
    Gift of R. Thornton Wilson, in memory of Florence Ellsworth Wilson, 1954 (54.147.94)

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