Hanging Lamp in the Form of a Peacock, Copper alloy, cast, Byzantine

Hanging Lamp in the Form of a Peacock

Date:
6th–7th century
Culture:
Byzantine
Medium:
Copper alloy, cast
Dimensions:
Overall (Lamp only): 6 x 6 x 2 1/16 in. (15.2 x 15.2 x 5.3 cm)
Overall (with object suspended): 14 5/8 x 6 x 2 1/16 in. (37.1 x 15.2 x 5.3 cm)
cross on chain: 2 5/16 x 1 1/8 x 3/8 in. (5.9 x 2.8 x 1 cm)
Classification:
Metalwork-Copper alloy
Credit Line:
Fletcher Fund, 1961
Accession Number:
61.111a, b
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 301
Conjuring images of the garden of paradise and heavenly splendor,
the peacock became a Christian symbol in the 300s.
[ Byron Th. Zoumboulakis, Geneva (found in Peloponnesus(?) - sold 1961)]
New York. Bard Graduate Center: Decorative Arts, Design History, Material Culture. "Lions, Dragons, and Other Beasts: Aquamanilia of the Middle Ages. Vessels for Church and Table," July 12, 2006–October 15, 2006.

Ferber, Stanley, ed. Islam and the Medieval West. Binghamton: University Art Gallery, State University of New York at Binghamton, 1975. no. 2.

Barnet, Peter. "'Beasts of Every Land and Clime': An Introduction to Medieval Aquamanilia." In Lions, Dragons, & Other Beasts: Aquamanilia of the Middle Ages, Vessels for Church and Table, edited by Peter Barnet, and Pete Dandridge. New York: Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design, and Culture, 2006. no. 34, p. 10.

Barnet, Peter, and Pete Dandridge, ed. Lions, Dragons, & Other Beasts: Aquamanilia of the Middle Ages, Vessels for Church and Table. New York: Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design, and Culture, 2006. no. 34, p. 179.

Dandridge, Pete. "Exquisite Objects, Prodigious Technique: Aquamanilia, Vessels of the Middle Ages." In Lions, Dragons, & Other Beasts: Aquamanilia of the Middle Ages, Vessels for Church and Table, edited by Peter Barnet, and Pete Dandridge. New York: Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design, and Culture, 2006. no. 34, p. 37.