Stela of Ptahmose

Period:
New Kingdom, Ramesside
Dynasty:
Dynasty 19
Date:
ca. 1320–1290 B.C.
Geography:
From Egypt; Probably from Memphite Region, Memphite Necropolis
Medium:
Limestone
Dimensions:
H. 142.2 cm (56 in)
Credit Line:
Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, 1967
Accession Number:
67.3
On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 124
This funerary stela, belonging to the royal Scribe and Overseer of the Royal Harem, Ptahmose, contains four separate offering prayers to Ptah-Soker-Osiris. Above the main text, Ptahmose himself appears, worshiping the god. The form, style, and text of the stela point to Memphis as its place of origin.

Frame, right

An "offering that the King gives" of Osiris, ruler of eternity, that he might give the ba coming forth in the necropolis, seeing the sun’s disk at dawn every day, receiving offerings that are presented on the altar of the lords of order, breathing air from myrrh and incense from the heart of god’s offerings: for the Osiris, royal scribe and overseer of the king’s private apartments of Memphis, Ptahmose, justified.

Frame, left

An "offering that the King gives" of Ptah-Sokar-Osiris in the secret chamber, that he may give entering and exiting Rosetjau, coming to rest in Abydos, changing into anything you desire, eating bread, taking in water and air, and being offered to in my chapel every day: for the Osiris, royal scribe and overseer of the king’s private apartments, Ptahmose, justified,

Scene, left

Osiris, foremost of the west, (2) great god, ruler of eternity.

Scene, right

Giving homage to Osiris, kissing the earth to (2) Wennefer, that he might give bread, water, air, cool water, (3) wine, milk, everything (4) good and pure, and offerings of every kind of fresh vegetables: (5) for the ka of the Osiris, (6) royal scribe and overseer of the king’s private apartments, Ptahmose, justified, begotten of the official and army scribe of the Lord of the Two Lands, Yuny, justified.

Text

An "offering that the King gives:" of Ptah-Sokar and Osiris in the secret chamber, the living ram, lord of Rosetjau —

When your processional image appears (2) in the Temple of Ptah’s Ka in Memphis, mistress of provisions, there is rejoicing in the noble Sokar-bark. (3) No god has access to your innermost place. Your evolution is distinguished in the face of the spirits, and the Ennead prepares (4) for you, (crying): "High of horns! Lord of the Atef-crown! Confident one who appears in the double crown, whose force is great (5) in the sight of the Two Lands, whose war-cry circulates even in the sunset mountain!"

Re is stopped at the sight of your perfection in your festival of procession (6) in the Netherworld. When you open the sight of those in the Silent Land, the westerners say "Welcome! Welcome!" When you brighten the sky, (7) the Two Banks laud you. When your rays lift the hearts of those under the covers, they uncover (8) their limbs that they may breathe your breath of life. When your voice is heard around (9) the great wadi of the Temple of Ptah’s Ka, and you are pulled in your festival, every god gives you (10) homage, their arms in adoration of your face, and they are excited, their hearts (11) happy when they see your countenance. —

for the Osiris, royal scribe and overseer of the king’s private apartments of Memphis, Ptahmose, justified. (12) He says: I am one of your true followers on this day of pulling you, for I am in front of you(r image) like your blessed (13) to whom the anointed fillet is given. May you let me occupy a place of eternity on the west of my town, the Temple of Ptah’s Ka, (14) and reach my father and ancestors who have gone in peace, with my limbs steadfast in (15) the king’s blessing, as he gives me a good old age and lets me reach the state of veneration without any evil in my limbs, all his followers (16) in my train, pulling me to the West. How fortunate is the blessed one for whom these things are done!

An "offering that the King gives" (17) of every good and pure thing and the sweet air of the north wind, for the ka of the blessed one who came forth blessed from the womb, the royal scribe and overseer of the king’s private apartments, Ptahmose, justified.




James P. Allen 2007
First noted as in the collection of M. Fournier, a french mechanic in the service of the Egyptian Navy as early as 1873. Brought by Lieutenant Commander Henry H. Gorringe from Egypt before 1885. Purchased in 1967 by the museum from Thayer Fremont-Smith, Boston, lawyer acting on behalf of Frank Fremont-Smith, Laura Fremont-Smith, and Dorothea Motley, eventual heirs of Mrs. Thomas Hiland, the sister of Henry H. Gorringe.