Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History



  • Manuscript of the Apocalypse, ca. 1330
    Normandy
    Paint, gold, silver, and brown ink on vellum; Each leaf: H. 12 1/8 in. (30.8 cm), W. 9 in. (22.9 cm)
    The Cloisters Collection, 1968 (68.174)

    The Apocalypse, or Book of Revelation, was, according to tradition, written in Greek by John the Evangelist during his exile on the island of Patmos. Recounting God's instructions to the bishops of the seven churches in Asia Minor, and revealing his own vision of the end of the world and the future kingdom of Christ, the Apocalypse was an extremely popular subject in medieval art. In addition to lavishly illustrated volumes of the Book of Revelation, such as this example, isolated scenes from the Apocalypse appeared with frequency on buildings, small-scale objects, and in an array of medieval books.

    Related


    On view at The Cloisers: Gallery 013
    Move Separator Print
    Close
  • Manuscript of the Apocalypse, ca. 1330
    Normandy
    Paint, gold, silver, and brown ink on vellum; Each leaf: H. 12 1/8 in. (30.8 cm), W. 9 in. (22.9 cm)
    The Cloisters Collection, 1968 (68.174)

    Folio 18

    No horse armor from the medieval period survives, and depictions from the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries are rare since armor tended to be hidden under caparisons which were in widespread use during the period. Although the subject of this illumination is visionary (the Apocalypse, or Book of Revelation, deals with the end of the world and the future kingdom of Christ), the armor on both beasts nonetheless gives a good impression of mail bards as worn by war horses during the Middle Ages. Each bard protects the neck and entire rump of the animal down to the belly (under normal circumstances the bard would have extended over the horse's head, and one may have expected some sort of cushioning undergarment or lining). A slit in the front facilitates leg movement, while another on either side would allow for the saddle strap to pass under and around the horse's belly. The small knot at the top of the side slit probably prevents the slit from tearing; alternatively, it may have offered a w


    Move
    Close